Events

Art is one of the ways people communicate with one another. Every work of art brings the viewer to into a special kind of relationship, both with whoever has created or is creating the art and also with everyone else who—together with him, or before or afterwards—is subject to that
artistic impression.
—Leo Tolstoy

It would be a mistake to ascribe this creative power
to an inborn talent.
In art, the genius creator is not just a gifted being, but a person who has succeeded in arranging for their appointed end, a complex of activities, of which the work is the outcome, requiring an effort.
—Henri Matisse

Art is so varied that to reduce it to any single purpose, be it even the salvation of mankind, is an abomination before the Lord.
—Nikolai Gumilev

Conception, my boy, fundamental brain work,
is what makes all the difference in art.
—Dante Gabriel Rosetti

Art is art.
Everything else is everything else.
—Ad Reinhardt

It is art that makes life, makes interest, makes importance…
and I know of no substitute whatever
for the force and beauty of its process.
—Henry James

It's not what you look at that matters,
it's what you see.
—Henry David Thoreau

  • Upcoming Events
  • Past Events

Archaist or AND Innovator

A Renaissance man and one of the most interesting and contradictory figures of the Romantic period, Alexander Griboedov became an emblem of his time, a hero of novels written by later generations.

In addition to a keen intellect and dry wit, Griboedov seemed to possess boundless energy and curiosity. The sheer number of his occupations and talents is astounding—he was a high-ranking diplomat of the Russian Empire, an admired composer, orientalist scholar, world traveler, gifted linguist and polyglot, and the author one very special play—the most famous, beloved, and without a doubt the most quoted literary work in the history of Russia.

In this unique program, excursions into Griboedov’s life, pursuits and world will be intermingled with performances and explanations of his musical and literary work.

THIS PROGRAM IS IN ENGLISH—ALL ARE WELCOME!

Go to the Archaist or AND Innovator Event Page to Find Out More.

Date: Tuesday, 1 December 2015
Time: 6:00pm—and not a moment later!
Location: Union Theological Seminar at Columbia University
Entrance on Broadway at 121st Street
Event is in the Social Hall

Co-sponsored by the Harriman Institute. With support from Rossotrudnichestvo.

This event is FREE.

Chekhov Lives!

Chekhov Lives! calls our attention to classic art in a world that desperately needs it. On September 25, 2015, hundreds of actors, writers, artists, athletes and scholars will read over fifty of Chekhov’s works. It's all broadcast live to a vast global audience. The broadcast readings are made available forever via a cutting-edge dedicated and searchable web site. The New York section of Chekhov Lives! includes TV personalities Budd Mishkin of NY1, Zhanna Agalakova; star of stage and screen Yelena Solovey; professors/scholars Cathy Popkin, Vladimir Alexandrov; Olympic and world champion figure skater Natalia Lineichuk; writers/poets Leonid Drozner, Julia Kisina, Igor Satanovsky; Bolshoi Ballet dancer Larissa Savelyeva and writer, literary critic and translator Liesl Schillinger.

The New York branch of Chekhov Lives! is run by Causa Artium in partnership with Google and Chekhov’s own Moscow Art Theater. The reading and broadcast are graciously hosted by the venerable Grolier Club, to which we extend our heartfelt gratitude.

25th September, 2015

Love on Demand

The focus is on a provocative and true story: for a few short years, the grinding tension of the Cold War was interrupted by a burst of US-Soviet amity. In 1942–3, Hollywood was drafted by Washington to encourage public sentiment to support a sudden intimacy with the old ideological foe. The phone calls were real—and Hollywood answered with some of the strangest films in its history.

Soon Russia was again the official enemy and these films were swept under the carpet, although one—The Northern Song—was reedited into an antiSoviet propaganda flick, Armored Attack!

The films are loaded—with Hollywood stars and Russian connections, from Gregory Peck, Walter Huston and Merle Oberon to Ukrainian-born Marlene Dietrich rival Anna Sten and Michael Chekhov, nephew of the great playwright; with music by Copland, lyrics by Gershwin, writing by Lillian Hellman.

Part of the Our Movies & the Russians Program

Go to the Love on Demand Event Page to Find Out More

First half of May—times & venues TBD, check back soon.

ALL FILMS are for the ENGLISH-SPEAKING public and are subtitled wherever necessary.

Discover the TransVerse

TransVerse opens doors into the finest, the most crucial, the most intriguing poetry out there today. Learn just who the poets are, how the poetry works—and then talk to them directly.

Each month, we bring a contemporary poet from another country, another language, another living tradition to the New York Public Library on 5th Avenue.

An expert and a translator introduce each poet, what sets that poet apart. Together with you they read and dissect two short poems, explaining how the poetry goes about producing significance.

Then the poet comes before the audience in person, via video bridge. In his own words, the poet conveys personal experience and, in parallel with the translator, reads his work.

The moderator and translator take the reading into a conversation with the poet and the audience is ultimately invited to join directly.

Go to the TransVerse Program Page

At the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue—dates & times will appear soon, check back frequently.

Our first guest poet will be announced shortly—stay tuned and check here regularly!

Diverging Perspectives 2.1

Diverging Perspectives is an experiment in adapting literature to the screen. It’s the impossible mission to translate the art of words—narration, word-play—to the screen.  Diverging Perspectives means premieres, rarities, and more.

DP 2.1 brings you adaptations of Italian literary classics:

Dante’s The Inferno, arguably the greatest achievement in the history of world literature;

Bocacchio’s Decameron, a work at the origin of the modern novel; and

Collodi’s Pinocchio, a prose tale far more strange and ambiguous than Disney’s audience tends to realize.

The audience is primed with expert talks—short, incisive, provocative; after each film, there are open guided discussions.

Part of the Diverging Perspectives Program

Go to the Diverging Perspectives 2.1 Event Page to Find Out More

Locations & times TK

Diverging Perspectives 2.2

Diverging Perspectives is an experiment in adapting literature to the screen. It’s about the impossible mission of translating the art of words—narration, word-play—to the moving image. Diverging Perspectives means cinematic premieres, rarities, stars in unexpected roles, and more.

Diverging Perspectives 2.2 focuses on French romanticism. We present intriguing juxtapositions of film adaptations of the Abbé Prévost sparkling and spicy Manon Lescaut, Mérimée's fiery Carmen and Stendhal’s dark and troubling The Red and the Black.

The audience is primed with expert talks—short, incisive, provocative; after each film we have open guided discussions.

Part of the Diverging Perspectives Program

Go to the Diverging Perspectives 2.2 Event Page for all the Details

ALL FILMS are for the ENGLISH-SPEAKING public and are subtitled wherever necessary.

Diverging Perspectives 2.3

Diverging Perspectives is an experiment in adapting literature to the screen. It’s the impossible mission to translate the art of words—narration, word-play—to the screen. Diverging Perspectives means premieres, rarities and more.

Diverging Perspectives 2.3 is our second Russian series and collects the most provocative adaptations of Gogol’s Ukrainian epic Taras Bulba, Turgenev’s risqué and disturbing First Love, and more.

Diverging Perspectives 2.3 also includes one last chance to catch the unique line-up of the fantastic first Diverging Perspectives series, including Gogol’s The Overcoat, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov and Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita.

The audience is primed for screenings with expert talks—short, incisive, provocative; after the films are open guided discussions.

Part of the Diverging Perspectives Program

Go to the Diverging Perspectives 2.3 Event Page to Find Out More

Locations & times TK

ALL FILMS are for the ENGLISH-SPEAKING public and are subtitled wherever necessary.

Primary Sources

Causa Artium works with the Debut Prize to bring a new group of Russia's most interesting young writers to America.

They will read from their latest works and speak out on issues for which they are, indeed primary sources: art, politics and life in the world's most vast and volatile nation.

The event featured Olga Slavnikova, author of the epic Booker-winning 2017 and one of Russia's top novelists, as well as Director of the Debut Prize, and Debut Prize winners and finalists Dmitry Biriukov, Irina Bogatyreva, Alisa Ganieva and Igor Saveliev.

Go to the Primary Sources Program Page

In Washington, D.C. At Georgetown University on Wednesday, 15 February 2012 at 4:30pm

In New York on Saturday, 18 February 2012 at 2:30pm at the Main Building of the New York Public Library.
Moderated by Leonard Lopate of NPR (WNYC Radio)

In Boston at Harvard on Wednesday, 22 February 2012 at 5:00pm
Moderated by Adam Ragusea of NPR (WBUR Radio)

New Faces, New Voices

Causa Artium joins with one of Russia's defining literary institutions, the Debut Prize, to bring you the cutting edge of new Russian writing.

Debut Prize writers are transforming the Russian literary landscape.

In May, 2011, Causa Artium brought the first of many delegations of what is coming to be called the "Debut Generation" to America to read their works and speak about their lives and their art.

The four writers were Irina Bogatyreva (Moscow), Polina Klyukina (Moscow), Pavel Kostin (Kaliningrad) and Andrei Kuzechkin (Nizhny Novgorod).

Go to the New Faces, New Voices Program Page

In Manhattan on Wednesday, 25 May 2011, at 8:00 pm at the Jerry Orbach Theater

In New Jersey on Friday, 20 May 2011, at 8:00 pm at the Museum of Russian Art

In Brooklyn on Sunday, 22 May 2011, at 3:30pm at the Brooklyn Public Library’s Central Library building

Art for Art's Sake

Leading New York artists hailing from Russia, contributed their work to an exhibition and silent auction to support Causa Artium and its programs in the arts.

Participating artists included: Vitaly Komar, Igor Tiulpanov, Elena Sarni, Natalia Danilin, Leonid Lerman, Zoya Frolova, and Janis Jakobson.

The show brought to light the enormous range and profound artistic talent of the Russian emigre creative world.

The show earned extremely positive reviews in the print and television media.

Go to the Art for Art's Sake Program Page

Wednesday, 23 February through Monday, 28 February from 1pm to 6pm daily

Opening Reception was held on Tuesday, 22 February from 6pm to 9:30pm

Histories Brands & Illusions

Dmitry Strakovsky's performances employ a fluid combination of extended vocal techniques with experimental sound processing.

Playfully shifting modal gears, Strakovsky takes the audience on an acoustic journey, testing our perceptions of our contemporary media environment.

Mr. Strakovsky and the Actual Performance! program were introduced by renowned artist Vitaly Komar and John William Narins; Komar and Narins began the post-performance discussion that then expanded to include the audience in the packed theater, lasting well over an hour.

Part of the Actual Performance! program

Go to the Histories, Brands and Illusions Event Page

Wednesday, 16 February at 7pm

RDFF 2014

The Russian Documentary Film Festival (RDFF) is an established annual New York cinema happening, a “festival of festivals” where all films screened are already festival winners.

Over three glorious days in October, RDFF 2014 will feature the US premieres of over twenty award-winning documentaries.

Special programs focus on contemporary Russian writers; the 50 years from the death of Vasily Grossman, author of the epic novel “Life and Fate”; the 100th anniversary of WWI; 70 years from Siege of Leningrad; and more.

RDFF is co-presented by Causa Artium and The New Review, the world's longest continually running Russian emigre literary journal.

FILMS ARE SUBTITLED FOR THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING AUDIENCE.

The Seventh Annual Russian Documentary Film Festival in New York

From Friday, October 10, through Sunday, October 12, 2014
at Tribeca Cinemas (54 Varick Street, Manhattan)

Additional screenings will be held at DCTV (Downtown Community Television Centre - 87 Lafayette St., Manhattan), Brooklyn Public Library (10 Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn) and Russian Centre «Otrada» (Village of Chestnut Ridge, NYS).

Tide Night 2011

Tide Night, or Old New Year's Eve, when the new year arrives by the old calendar.

There is something magical about the date, and in 2011 we rang it in with art and revelry, music and poetry, wine and song!

The core of the evening were readings by the poets of the Novaya Koja literary mag, a wildly various and highly talented group.

And with them—musicians, singers, and writers, and more!

Go to the Tide Night Program Page

Old New Year's Day, Friday, 14 January 2011

Diverging Perspectives 1.1

Diverging Perspectives is an ongoing experiment in adapting of literature to the screen. It’s all about the impossible mission to translate the art of words—colorful narration, puns and other forms of word-play—to the moving image. Diverging Perspectives gives cinematic premieres, rarities, stars in unexpected roles, and more.

The festival contrasted radically differing adaptations of Gogol’s mysterious The Overcoat, Dostoevsky’s titanic The Brothers Karamazov and Bulgakov’s cult classic The Master and Margarita.

The series sparkled with the US premieres and great performances by Lee J. Cobb, William Shatner, and Yul Brynner.

The audience was primed for each screening with talks—short, incisive, provocative—by the experts. And after each film they had the opportunity to react in open guided discussion.

Part of the Diverging Perspectives Program

Go to the Diverging Perspectives 1.1 Event Page

Old New Year's Day, Friday, 14 January 2011

ALL FILMS are for the ENGLISH-SPEAKING public and are subtitled wherever necessary.